Trimble Introduces the Next Generation of 3D Paving Control for Pavers

PAVING THE WAY WITH TECHNOLOGY

Trimble has recently introduced the Trimble® Roadworks 3D Paving Control Platform for Pavers, the next-generation platform for 3D paving control systems. Trimble Roadworks is a highly accurate, automatic 3D screed control system that can significantly improve paving productivity and rideability by directly referencing the design rather than a surface or stringline to minimise usage, reduce waste and overruns and finish projects on time and under budget.

When used with a traditional paving machine with a tractor and hydraulically controlled floating screed with a supported 2D system, Trimble Roadworks can be used to place any variety of materials, including hot asphalt, cold recycled asphalt, road base, gravel, concrete treated base, sand or any other paving material.


Intuitive Software, Flexible Hardware

The Android-based application runs on the 10-inch (25.7 centimetre) touch-screen Trimble TD520 Display. Trimble Roadworks software has a familiar interface for Trimble users, designed for operator efficiency. Colourful graphics, natural interactions and gestures, and self-discovery features make the software intuitive and easy to learn. Each operator can personalise the interface to match their workflow; configurable views make it easier to see the right perspective for maximum productivity. State-of-the-art software and hardware give operators of all skill levels the ability to work faster and more productively than ever before.

Trimble Roadworks leverages Trimble's proven system hardware, rugged and durable for tough paving conditions. By design, utilising components from Trimble Earthworks increases the portability of the hardware and increases return on investment. Using the Android operating system, users can also download other third-party applications that provide the operator with additional useful tools inside the cab.

"Trimble Roadworks is easy to learn and more accessible for many different types of contractors because it leverages the intuitive Trimble machine control interface and applies it to pavers," said Kevin Garcia, general manager for Trimble Civil Construction Specialty Solutions. "This platform also makes it possible to include Trimble's industry-leading paving technology as part of a connected site ecosystem of solutions, which is valuable for complex infrastructure projects."

 

Connectivity

Office-to-field connectivity reduces waste and overruns with efficient communication and data transferring across the project. Using a Trimble SNM941 Connected Site® Gateway, Trimble Roadworks allows the transfer of 3D designs from the office to the machine via the cloud so that the operator is always using the latest design. In addition, productivity data collected from the machine is automatically synced back to the office.

 

Availability

Trimble Roadworks 3D Paving Control Platform for Pavers is now available through your local SITECH Construction Systems. For more information, call 1800 SITECH (1800 748 324).

Precise 3D paving boosts safety at transport terminal

Usually asphalt is paved with ride-ability in mind but not at the NSW Ports’ Intermodal Logistics Centre at Enfield in South-West Sydney. It requires one of the world’s most level surfaces. Bumps, uneven grades or accumulated water can be hazardous to the wheeled cranes that carry 90 metric ton loads, high and heavy, across the surface.

This leads to some very tight tolerances during the paving of the centre, particularly its Intermodal rail (Terminal) section, where the heavy loads are transferred for distribution.

The desired paving tolerances had average conformance of 0 millimetres and standard deviation of 4 millimetres across an area of 92 000 square meters.

When asked to investigate new technologies that might be able to meet the desired tolerances Boral conducted a thorough evaluation of 3D paving solutions. Ultimately Trimble 3D Paving Control System was selected.

See the case study on the Trimble site to see how Boral was able to meet the tight tolerances.

No room for error at 322 km/h

Racetracks are often one of the most demanding jobs. The paving needs to be smooth – at 322 kilometres per hour (or 200 miles per hour) there is no room for error.

Scotty’s Contracting & Stone were well aware of this when constructing the National Corvette Museum Motorsports Park in Kentucky, USA. Tolerances were tight and there were strict specifications. One specification was that there could not be deviations of more than 3mm around the track. Another was that there could be an unevenness of the longitudinal joint in the centre of the surface. Wet weather delays also challenged the tight timeframe.

To make sure they were achieving specifications they used technology, including 3D Paving.

When it was completed Mitch Wright, GM of NCM Motorsports Park called it ‘a hyper-smooth racetrack – the envy of the industry’.